Reconciliation

Racial trauma is the accumulative effects of racism on an individual’s mental and physical health. In this episode, David and John sit down with psychologist Helen Malgas to discuss racial trauma, what it is, and how it affects us. Can even processes of speaking out or reconciliation contribute to continued racial trauma? How has the church in the past contributed to racial trauma and how might churches today be continuing…
In this episode David and John discuss former deputy president FW de Klerk's recent statement (and subsequent apology) that apartheid was not a crime against humanity. We discussd de Klerk's history of similar statements, as well as his testimony before the TRC. We probed what biblical repentance could look like and explored if the church in South Africa was guilty of a cheap repentance. In particular we asked if white…
In this episode David and John sat down with the "godfather" of African American theology Dr Carl Ellis. We spoke about black consciousness, Dr King and Malcolm X and the limited gospel of American evangelicalism. We heard how black consciousness gave Dr Ellis the right questions with which to approach the text. And how Dr Ellis' own theological education had little to say to the context of his life and…
Our theology and our church culture have not given us the permission, the language or the means to adequately sit with the despair, the anger and the shame of racial injustice, ongoing trauma, and a deeply scarring history. We need to recover the lost gift of lament. Without first learning how to lament we can never truly experience reconciliation. In this episode David and John explore biblical lament. Why is…
Racism has both an individual and a structural element and as such is intricately linked to systems of power and privilege. This talk probes us to examine the intricate link between power and prejudice within both society and the church. And then, building on the work and example of Christ in Philippians 2, invites us to consider what a biblical theology of power and privilege could look like as we…
Makhanda Nxele. Remember that name Questions linger whether the inciting incident where people were forcibly removed from Clifton beach last month was an instance of racism masquerading as concern about crime or simply a misunderstood but legitimate response to crime. There are also questions whether the subsequent cleansing ceremony itself was properly done according to African customs, or whether it is an instance of the weaponization of African culture for…
Some of us might try to fight it but there is something psychologically compelling about the somewhat arbitrary changing of the calendar year that resonates with our desire for change. Amidst all the new gym memberships, course enrollments, and best intentions here are five relatively simple ways in which you might take some steps towards living more justly in 2018.
How do we theologically understand violence? Is there biblical warrant for a broader definition of violence? What does it mean to be peacemakers in a context of both repeated, overt acts of violence and insidious systemic violence? How does the gospel shape our understanding of and reaction to both behavioural and systemic violence? These are questions and concerns addressed in this talk.