John Scheepers

There are within evangelicalism today, Tim Chester claims, two apparently competing gospels offering alternative views on not only the nature of the gospel (for individuals or for society?) and the meaning of Jesus death of cross (soteriological or political?) but also the mission and the role of the church today (proclamation or social action). These two gospels, are in fact one gospel. What is required for us though is to better understand how these two emphases are integrally related to one another in forming one gospel.

Some of us might try to fight it but there is something psychologically compelling about the somewhat arbitrary changing of the calendar year that resonates with our desire for change. Amidst all the new gym memberships, course enrollments, and best intentions here are five relatively simple ways in which you might take some steps towards living more justly in 2018.

The Old Testament time of Jubilee is a beautiful picture of a different way of living among God’s people where the generational cycles of poverty are broken and interrupted through a series of intentional, deliberately different ways of living economically, socially and spiritually among God’s people. In this first of a two-part talk John Scheepers explores how the institution of Jubilee was designed to break those inter-generational cycles of poverty and exclusion as well as the implications for us today.

Jesus death on the cross is the comprehensive Jubilee event. It is through the death of Jesus that victory and liberation is brought to all of creation. The cross is not that which replaced the Jubilee (as if all the socio-political and economic aspects simply drop away leaving only a spiritual significance) it is the fulfillment of the Jubilee including the total redemptive accomplishment and final liberation from all that enslaves and oppresses humanity and creation.

How do we theologically understand violence? Is there biblical warrant for a broader definition of violence? What does it mean to be peacemakers in a context of both repeated, overt acts of violence and insidious systemic violence? How does the gospel shape our understanding of and reaction to both behavioural and systemic violence? These are questions and concerns addressed in this talk.

Is Reconciliation Even the Right Word? There is a somewhat popular line of thought among social justice advocates that we should drop the use of the word reconciliation altogether. There never was, the argument goes, a time in which white and black existed in any kind of united or harmonious relationship in South Africa, and…

For over a hundred years the church has had running debates as to which is more important, social justice or gospel proclamation. In this session John Scheepers will briefly trace the importance of justice throughout the biblical story and call us to rediscover a cross centred justice movement at the heart of the gospel.

Over the last few years, South Africa has been exposed to frequent acts of violence, many of which have been politically or racially motivated. From the white man who beat a black domestic worker claiming he thought she was a prostitute, to the pummelling of black students who interrupted a rugby match at the University…